Pyramid Rock

February 7, 2024.

6 mi. | 1170′ ele. gain | 3:15 hr

Photo album

We pulled into Red Rock Park, New Mexico to camp the evening before. For those of you who are counting, this is our second park named Red Rock of this trip. (The first was back in California.) The drive in was breathtakingly beautiful. After checking in to our dire little spot for the night, we walked to the trailhead to catch a glimpse of the rock formations up close. They were pinstriped red, yellow, orange, with swaths of green vegetation below. I went to sleep dreaming of red rocks.

I awoke to nothing less than a winter wonderland. Overhead, the gray clouds sprinkled down snow on a white landscape. The forecast called for snow and wind all day, so I dressed for a winter hike, packed some hot ramen and planned to just hike as far as I could, my heart not set on reaching a destination. I had the route mapped to Pyramid Rock just in case the trails were good enough, but I’d be happy with just getting out for a lovely walk.

The footprints on the trail came to an end pretty close to the trailhead; it was clear I’d be the only one out and about today. The trail was pretty well marked. I traversed mud, gravel, slickrock and chunky rock surfaces. Some places were covered in snow, others were just wet. The steeper sections of slickrock had steps chopped into them, which I found immensely valuable today. I moved slowly and intentionally to avoid slipping and falling. Some of the sloped sections lay right above deep washes. I did not need to go for a ride today.

While the trails appeared deadly slippery, I found that I had excellent traction 99% of the time. I only slipped when I was moving too fast or not paying attention. After doing that a few times, I never lost traction again.

Cairns were placed along the trail to mark the way. There were signs, too. And for the most part the trail was well-marked. I tried to train my eyes to the cairns, which were sometimes difficult to see amidst the snow. Despite the trail markings, my map and my familiarity with trail finding, I lost the route a few times and wandered off track. The terrain was quite complex and the trail did not always follow the intuitive path. Upon realizing my errors, I made it back to the trail and scanned for cairns more closely. Undeterred by these short misadventures, I kept moving forward and eventually had Pyramid Rock in my sights.

I got a glorious sun break as I headed up the last stretch to the summit. I found a wind-sheltered spot behind a rock to set my pad down and enjoy a warm lunch. The sun remained bright for my entire rest break, so enjoyed panoramic views of the incredible landscape.

Based on the conditions and the fact that I would rather follow my steps back than break a new trail, I decided to return the way I came instead of making a loop. It was the right call. At some point during the hike down, the storm settled in for good and my sun went away. The wind blew consistently and the snow fell in earnest. I moved as quickly as I could without being reckless. I was grateful that my boots performed so well on the wet snow and rock. The downhill sections that I dreaded turned out to be not too bad and I made it back to the trailhead with no slips or stumbles.

I’m a firm believer that most weather can be endured with the right gear, attitude and preparation. Today was one of those days. And, it wasn’t nearly as bad as I thought it might be. In fact, I found most of the hike quite enjoyable and remarkably beautiful. It was also very quiet, since most people do not share my approach to hiking in the snow! While I didn’t set any speed records, that wasn’t the point. I loved every moment of being out in red rock country during a winter storm, even those frustrating moments of getting sucked off route. It’s good when the universe reminds me that despite my experience, I always have something to learn, and that I should always be paying attention.

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