Acoma-Zuni Trail

February 9, 2024.

8.7 miles | 225′ ele. gain| 5:15 hr.

Photo album

I was skeptical about making a stop at El Malpais National Monument, since I’ve had my fair share of hiking in volcanic terrain. How fun would this place be? I’m in Arizona, I want to see something new.

Lava landscape

After spending half a day on the Acoma-Zuni trail, I changed my mind completely. The trail follows an ancient path used by native people to traverse the lava flow from village to village. It’s marked mostly with rock cairns placed on top of the lava. Rock on rock can be deceptively challenging to follow, so it was a bit like going on an Easter egg hunt. But that’s what made it so much fun! I enjoyed scanning the terrain for the next trail marker, moving slowly so as not to get lost or disoriented on the difficult terrain.

In addition to the uneven rock and cracks in the lava, I also had to negotiate slippery snow patches and spiky catches. It was a real obstacle course! The sunshine helped cut through the bitterly cold air and breezes. It was quiet and peaceful as I crossed the flow from one side to the other.

Just before reaching my exit trailhead, where Aaron would pick me up, I took a small detour. A tiny hump called Encerrito was too close to skip. I scrambled up the side of the butte and, to my surprise, found a summit register on top. After signing in and having a snack, I found a nice place from which to do a watercolor painting of a beautiful mountain view. The whole area was so serene and idyllic, I could have stayed there forever. But, my ankles were glad to be done. The constant walking across tilted rocks became very tiring by the end of the hike!

And then…dogs

But the clouds had rolled in and now the air was bone-chilling cold. I finished the painting and hiked back down to the trailhead. On my way, I encountered three off-leash dogs barking and barreling down the trail right at me. I had no time to react. One of the dogs tried to bite me, leaving slobber all over my pant leg. I was furious, and all the owner had to say to me was “I didn’t think anyone would be on this trail.”

No apology. He could have stopped at saying “I didn’t think.” If you have three uncontrolled and aggressive dogs, you damn well better have them leashed or don’t take them out on a trail. It snapped me out of the joyous mood I was in and made me angry for the rest of the day. I don’t know how some dog owners can be so clueless when it comes to understanding that other people exist in the world and choose not to acknowledge how their dogs’ behavior impacts other people. I’ve had enough negative dog encounters that I know this was not a rare incident. One of many reasons I try really hard to go hiking where other people aren’t. I don’t trust them to be able to handle their dogs.

To the responsible dog owners, thank you. To the people who take the time to train their dogs, thank you. To the folks who leave their aggressive dogs at home when they go hiking, thank you. To the people who keep their dogs leashed when required, thank you. I always notice and appreciate when people take pro-social steps when going out with their dogs. Since I’m allergic to dogs, it’s also important to me that “friendly” dogs do not approach me. If you’re a dog lover, please keep this in mind: not everyone wants to or can interact with your dog. And I really don’t want to have to explain this to every person I meet on the trail.

Unfortunately, we only had one day in this park, so we had to move on. I’m glad I got to see what I did, and I’d be curious to return and check out some of the other hikes, caves and highpoints.

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