Picacho Peak

December 24, 2023.

7.9 mi. | 2340′ ele. gain | 7 hr.

Photo album

We spent the night among the saguaro at Picacho Peak State Park (pronounced pee-KAH-cho). In the morning, we weighed our hiking options. We could drive to the trailhead, do the short but steep hike up the peak and back, or we could hike from the campground. I thought the flat trail leading to the trailhead would be a nice warmup for the main course, so that’s what we did.

Along the flats, we heard and saw many birds that we were just getting to know, like the cactus wren and gila woodpecker. At the trailhead, we paused to look at the map and prepare for the steep switchbacks that were soon to come. I had read a little about this trail so I knew there were cables and ladders near the top. It sounded like a fun adventure.

We arrived at the cables much sooner than necessary; they felt like a nuisance on some of the earlier sections. Maybe, I thought, they were useful when the ground was wet? It seemed like an over-engineered situation for most people.

At the saddle, before the real climbing began, we ran into a volunteer ranger. He was friendly and offered up some useful tips for the next portion of the hike. He also confirmed that our plan to climb to the top and the circle around the backside was a good one. With that, we started hiking…down! The trail drops several hundred feet before ascending again. Now, I was sure glad for those cables! Some of the rock was steeply slanted and slippery, with plenty of exposure to cactus-studded slopes below.

We encountered many other groups on the final ascent to the summit. Some were wearing santa hats and there were choruses of “Merry Christmas!” every few minutes. The mood was fun and cheery; everyone seemed to be having a great time.

When we got to the summit, a huge cloud bank had taken over the sky. With the sun tucked behind the huge gray drapes, temperatures dropped quite a bit. Most people were dressed lightly for a quick Arizona mountain hike. But we’d packed fleeces and wind layers so we could hang out on top as long as we wanted. We ate lunch, then I painted and Aaron read his book. It stayed fairly quiet up there as people came and quickly left.

On the way down, we followed the cables back to the junction with the Sunset Vista trail, which looped around the south side of the mountain. Here’s where we found the steepest and most fun section of cables bolted to a long slab. Conveniently located indents in the rock created a stair-step pattern that made me question whether they were added by humans or not. Starting from the top, we couldn’t see where the cables ended up; they disappeared into the abyss. Good times.

The backside of the mountain was refreshingly quiet. We enjoyed the variety of scenery and all the cactus. A short road walk from the trail led back to the campground. If I were to do it all over again, I’d choose to do it the same way. But maybe in spring when all the wildflowers are blooming!

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