Mt. Ajo

January 24, 2024.

9.3 mi. | 2750′ ele. gain | 5:30 hr.

Photo album

I woke up before sunrise to drive to the Mt. Ajo trailhead in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. It was cool and overcast, which is great weather for southern Arizona hiking! As soon as I geared up and hit the trail, I found myself in a cactus paradise. Since it had rained a ton lately, I kept my eyes peeled for wildflowers. Within the first mile, I found two ocotillo plants in bloom. Their bright red flowers exploded from the gangly, green branches twisting into the sky.

Still feeling sick, I plodded uphill slowly, taking many short breaks. I committed at the start of the hike to take a longer sit-down break on the hour every hour, no matter how I was feeling, plus any additional stops I wanted. This strategy allowed ample recovery time so that I could keep hiking all day. I was the tortoise, not the hare.

I could hear water running in the canyons; an unusual sound. The trail crossed a few seasonal creeks as it climbed to its end. An unofficial route continues up to the summit of Mt. Ajo. For much of its length, the trail was well marked and brushed out, a rarity for summit scrambles! But I think Mt. Ajo is a relatively common destination and it’s located in a National Monument.

Every aspect of the route offered something new to look at and lots of reasons to stop and catch my breath. The low clouds kept the summit shrouded in mystery for most of the hike. I huffed and puffed up the steep gully leading to the final traverse, taking a few steps at a time before resting. This cold was really kicking my ass.

On the long, high traverse, I spied a few flowers: a mustard and a few paintbrush. The rocky ridge went in and out of view as the clouds shifted. When surveillance aircraft were not flying nearby, it was spectacularly quiet. Here, just a few miles from the US-Mexico border, you’re constantly reminded of how dangerous migrants are. There is lots of official signage telling you to report any suspicious activity. When I overhear conversations among tourists in the area, there’s a lot of fear, anxiety and blame. It’s unsettling, to say the least. I feel heartened when driving through local towns where there are resources for migrants and yard signs reminding folks of the basic humanity that all of us share. Hearing helicopters and sonic booms while hiking in the mountains reminds me that the U.S. sure does have a lot of money to spend, but not necessarily on the things that will reduce fear and help people thrive.

As all these thoughts swirl in my head, I reach the summit, completely immersed in water vapor. I was glad that I made myself stop for a snack break just a half mile before. It was not a pretty spot since there were antennas and equipment everywhere. I tagged the top and immediately started my descent.

Once I went down enough to get out of the coldest, wettest air, I sat down and pulled out my thermos of ramen. At that moment I was really glad I took a real lunch on my hike. So satisfying and energizing!

The rest of the day, I walked in peace. I relished every shrub, rock, trickle of water, cactus, fleeting cloud and flash of feathers. I was glad I dragged myself out of bed to be in nature, despite how bad I felt. As always, and especially as I get wiser, I give myself the option of turning around at any point. The summit is a nice treat, but it’s not a requirement. I know that every minute I spend outside is valuable no matter what I “accomplish” while I’m out there. It took me many years to come to this realization, but I think this attitude will help me continue to seek joy and solace outdoors no matter what my physical state happens to be.

As I returned to the trail and began the loop down, I ran into one other hiker. It was an older woman, wearing a big sun hat, with an InReach mini on her pack and a huge smile on her face. We shared a few lines of conversation and went on our respective ways. Her stoke filled me right up and I rode that wave of happiness all the way down to the parking lot. Damn right I’m going to be that older person one day.

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