Brown Canyon to Ramsay Canyon

January 4, 2024.

12.4 mi | 2000′ ele. gain | 5:10 hr.

Snow-kissed view

Photo album

We stayed with friends in Sierra Vista for a couple days, and they recommended hiking right from their backyard into the mountains. I couldn’t resist. With a hand-drawn map in my pocket, I walked along the neighborhood streets, admiring all the southwest architecture and noticing…a blimp? I sent a pic to my friend Sarah, who’s obsessed with all things aviation. She quickly fired back an article written from the perspective of a local who first learned about the blimp on a field trip in kindergarten. (It’s a great article, you should definitely read it). I scanned the article as the cold air froze my face and my heart sunk yet again; more surveillance. I guess that’s the tradeoff people need to learn to live with in a border town. I hate it.

Blimp.

Soon, I reached a backdoor entrance to Brown Canyon Ranch. The open desert scrub gave way to a mixed coniferous forest, which provided a nice wind buffer. By this point, I had already seen plenty of people out enjoying the trails. Mostly older folks, all on foot except for one cyclist. Despite it being mid-week and with weather coming in, everyone seemed to be having a great time!

The novelty of snow crunching underfoot on a trip to Arizona made me smile. Back in Bend, my friends were lamenting how they hadn’t been able to get their skis out yet. Everything seemed topsy-turvy. I climbed the trail into the Miller Canyon Wilderness, enjoying the water trickling in the canyon. According to my offline map, the trail should intersect with another one that traverses across to Ramsay Canyon. I planned to take the connector trail, come down through Ramsay Canyon and walk the road back to Brown canyon and to my friends’ house. They did not know I had this grand plan, of course, but how could I resist the lure of a loop over an out-and-back hike?

I tried to stay on the main trail in the canyon, despite several offshoots going off in every direction. After passing the Pomona Mine junction, I stayed left, presumably on the main trail. The snow got a little deeper, and I found myself sharing the trail only with deer prints. When I checked my map, it appeared I was off trail, but I could see water bars and other engineered features, so I kept going. Eventually my track joined the one on the map; maybe the trail was re-routed and the apps were not updated.

Agave in the snow

It was so peaceful along this stretch of the hike. Snow fell, sometimes in delicate sprinkles and sometimes in a hurry. I caught glimpses of the higher peaks through gaps in the trees. I kept moving because I had all my layers on and it was still chilly, but so many times I wanted to stop and soak in all the magic that was happening.

When I arrived at the Hamburg trail, which led down into Ramsay Canyon, I saw a flurry of human tracks. I followed them down into another gorgeous canyon lined with many different trees I didn’t bother to identify. While looking for a place to paint, I stumbled across a signed viewpoint and headed that way. I found a beautiful spot to sit. It had a clear, unobstructed view upcanyon. And the full force of the weather was upon me. I knew as soon as I sat down, the clock was ticking.

I made it about 20 minutes before my fingers were so cold I could barely hold the brush. DONE! I said, and quickly packed up my things. I held on to my open sketchbook as I hiked, hoping the paint would dry before I got down to the Nature Conservancy building.

When I arrived, I ducked inside to use the bathroom, which was lovely and warm. I chatted with a friendly volunteer and wandered through the small gift shop before continuing my walk. I still had to hike out of the canyon and get back into the neighborhoods!

As I passed through the parking area and down the road, I heard a flurry of squawks and saw some movement. Turkeys! So many turkeys, hanging out in a small greenspace. Walking up the road. Making a commotion. There were a couple groups of at least 20 each. As I kept wandering down the road, they wobbled up toward me. After the turkeys, then there were deer. First one, then another, then many more. The longer I walked, the more wildlife I saw, and all of it was located out of the boundary of the Nature Conservancy site. I had dreaded this road walk when I planned this hike, but it turned out to be one of my favorite parts! The sun had come back out, I was warm and comfortable, there was so much to look at.

Turkeys!

The last major turn took me down a dirt road to Brown Canyon Ranch. I found a trail that roughly paralleled the road and walked on that. The wind was blowing fiercely by the time I made it to the ranch, so I went inside to get a break. The ranch had been preserved with furniture, books and interpretive exhibits inside. I would have enjoyed it more if I hadn’t just walked 10 miles.

I braced myself for going back out into the wind and took a detour along a nature trail and pond. There, I saw a red tailed hawk, roadrunner and a single ring-necked duck floating on a small pond. The rest of the hike involved walking back along the side streets in Sierra Vista. What an excellent way to spend a day!

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